Keygenning Carbon Copy Cloner Keychain Password

Passwords are a modern annoyance and their diversity is something you can’t avoid if you want a minimum amount of account security (don’t forget to turn on those 2FA options, avoiding SMS versions if possible). They get more annoying when you set a super smart new password with that smug feeling that it is such a great password that you will never forget about it (or something crappy you set in a rush). [Read More]

Reversing and Keygenning qwertyoruiop's Crackme

I was bored this weekend and decided to take some rust out of my reversing skills before they disappear for good. I have spent the past two years or so mostly writing C code (secure C is more like an asymptote but that is why it is a fun challenge) and barely doing any serious reverse engineering and security research. So I decided to revisit some unfinished business with qwertyoruiop’s crackme. [Read More]

Shut up snitch! – reverse engineering and exploiting a critical Little Snitch vulnerability

Little Snitch was among the first software packages I tried to reverse and crack when I started using Macs. In the past I reported some weaknesses related to their licensing scheme but I never audited their kernel code since I am not a fan of IOKit reversing. The upcoming DEF CON presentation on Little Snitch re-sparked my curiosity last week and it was finally time to give the firewall a closer look. [Read More]

Apple EFI firmware passwords and the SCBO myth

My original goal when I started poking around Apple’s EFI implementation was to find a way to reset a MacBook’s firmware password. My preliminary research found references to a “magical” SCBO file that could be loaded onto a USB flash drive and booted to remove the password. The normal process workflow is to first contact Apple support. Since I don’t have the original sales receipt of this specific Mac, I assume this option isn’t possible, since anyone with a stolen Mac could get the password reset. [Read More]

The Italian morons are back! What are they up to this time?

Nothing 😃. HackingTeam was deeply hacked in July 2015 and most of their data was spilled into public hands, including source code for all their sofware and also some 0day exploits. This was an epic hack that shown us their crap internal security but more important than that, their was of doing things and internal and external discussions, since using PGP was too much of an annoyance for these guys (Human biases are a royal pain in the ass, I know! [Read More]

Reversing Apple’s syslogd bug

Two days ago El Capitan 10.11.3 was released together with security updates for Yosemite and Mavericks. The bulletin available here describes nine security issues, most of them related to kernel or IOKit drivers. The last security issue is about a memory corruption issue on syslog that could lead to arbitratry code execution with root privileges. I was quite curious about this bug mostly because it involved syslogd, a logging daemon. [Read More]

London and Asia EFI monsters tour!

Finally back home from China and Japan tour, so it’s time to finally release the updated slides about EFI Monsters. After Secuinside I updated them a bit, fixing stuff I wasn’t happy with and adding some new content. The updated version was first presented at 44CON London. I had serious reservations about going to the UK (not even in transit!) but Steve Lord and Adrian charm convinced me to give it a try. [Read More]

Reversing Prince Harming’s kiss of death

The suspend/resume vulnerability disclosed a few weeks ago (named Prince Harming by Katie Moussouris) turned out to be a zero day. While (I believe) its real world impact is small, it is nonetheless a critical vulnerability and (another) spectacular failure from Apple. It must be noticed that firmware issues are not Apple exclusive. For example, Gigabyte ships their UEFI with the flash always unlocked and other vendors also suffer from all kinds of firmware vulnerabilities. [Read More]

Shakacon #6 presentation: Fuck you Hacking Team, From Portugal with Love.

Aloha, Shakacon number 6 is over, it was a blast and I must confess it beat my expectations. Congratulations to everyone involved in making it possible. Definitely recommended if you want to speak or attend, and totally worth the massive jet lag. My presentation was about reverse engineering Hacking Team OS X malware latest known sample. The slide count is 206 and I was obviously not able to present everything. The goal is that you have a nice reference available for this malware and also MPRESS unpacking (technically dumping). [Read More]

Analysis of CoinThief/A "dropper"

There is no such thing as malware in OS X but last week another sample was spotted and made the “news”. I am talking about CoinThief, a malware designed to hijack Bitcoin accounts and steal everything (I must confess I laughed a bit; I think Bitcoin is just a bullshit pyramid scheme but I digress). There are a few samples out there, in different stages of evolution, so this is probably not a very recent operation. [Read More]