SyScan360 Singapore 2016 slides and exploit code

The exploit for the bug I presented last March at SyScan360 is today one year old so I decided to release it. I wasn’t sure if I should do it or not since it can be used in the wild but Google Project Zero also released a working version so it doesn’t really make a difference. I’m also publishing here the final version of the slides that differ slightly from the version made available at the corporate blog. [Read More]

London and Asia EFI monsters tour!

Finally back home from China and Japan tour, so it’s time to finally release the updated slides about EFI Monsters. After Secuinside I updated them a bit, fixing stuff I wasn’t happy with and adding some new content. The updated version was first presented at 44CON London. I had serious reservations about going to the UK (not even in transit!) but Steve Lord and Adrian charm convinced me to give it a try. [Read More]

BSides Lisbon and SECUINSIDE 2015 presentations

I guess my goal for the remaining 2015 of not doing any presentations will not happen. Two weeks ago I presented at BSides Lisbon 2015 and last week at SECUINSIDE 2015. I’m very happy to see BSides Lisbon returning after the first edition in 2013. Congrats to Bruno, Tiago, and the rest of the team for making it happen. It’s still a small conference but I’m glad they are making it happen, and I will always do my best to help the Portuguese scene going forward. [Read More]

Reversing Prince Harming’s kiss of death

The suspend/resume vulnerability disclosed a few weeks ago (named Prince Harming by Katie Moussouris) turned out to be a zero day. While (I believe) its real world impact is small, it is nonetheless a critical vulnerability and (another) spectacular failure from Apple. It must be noticed that firmware issues are not Apple exclusive. For example, Gigabyte ships their UEFI with the flash always unlocked and other vendors also suffer from all kinds of firmware vulnerabilities. [Read More]

Shakacon #6 presentation: Fuck you Hacking Team, From Portugal with Love.

Aloha, Shakacon number 6 is over, it was a blast and I must confess it beat my expectations. Congratulations to everyone involved in making it possible. Definitely recommended if you want to speak or attend, and totally worth the massive jet lag. My presentation was about reverse engineering Hacking Team OS X malware latest known sample. The slide count is 206 and I was obviously not able to present everything. The goal is that you have a nice reference available for this malware and also MPRESS unpacking (technically dumping). [Read More]

Rex vs The Romans – Anti Hacking Team Kernel Extension

After surviving the five shots at SyScan’s WhiskeyCon I am finally back home and you get a chance to see the slides and code for the TrustedBSD module I presented there. The goal of REX vs The Romans is to work as detection and prevention tool of _Hacking Team_’s OS X malware. The TrustedBSD hook allows to detect if the system is already infected, and the Kauth listener to warn about any future infection. [Read More]

Breaking OS X signed kernel extensions with a NOP

For some reason Apple wants to change external kernel extensions location from /System/Library/Extensions to /Library/Extensions and introduced in Mavericks a code signing requirement for all extensions and/or drivers located in that folder. Extensions will not be loaded if not signed (those located in the “old” folder and not signed will only generate a warning [check my SyScan360 slides]). The signing certificates require a special configuration and to obtain them you need to justify it. [Read More]

SyScan360 Beijing slides

Eight days and 10 flights later I am back from SyScan360 in Beijing. It was my first visit to China and I had lots of fun observing many things that I only “knew” from reading. The scale and dimension of everything in Beijing is quite a surprise. No wonder why every Western company wants to be there. We had great food and an awesome visit to the Great Wall. A big thank you to the boys and girls from the organization for all their hard work and dedication. [Read More]

Kextstat_ASLR util or how to start hiding your kernel rootkit in Mountain Lion

Welcome back! This is a small post about a quick util that I created yesterday’s night while working on a side project. Mountain Lion introduced kernel ASLR and the kextstat util output doesn’t support (yet?) this feature. The addresses are not the real ones and this is quite annoying (kgmacros from kernel debugging kit also seem to fail at this!). What this util does is to read the kernel extensions information via the /dev/kmem device (hence this util is probably not useful for a large audience) and display it like kextstat does with the correct address for each kext (just the most important information, the linked against info might be added in the future). [Read More]

Tales from Crisis, Chapter 4: A ghost in the network

This chapter was supposed to be about additional methods to detect OS.X/Crisis but I had the evil idea of taking full control of Crisis, and played with this idea for the last couple of days. It’s pretty damm easy to customize the dropper, and at the limit, be able to deploy your own version of Crisis to anyone. This raises some problematic questions, some of which I was fooling around with at Twitter. [Read More]