London and Asia EFI monsters tour!

Finally back home from China and Japan tour, so it’s time to finally release the updated slides about EFI Monsters. After Secuinside I updated them a bit, fixing stuff I wasn’t happy with and adding some new content. The updated version was first presented at 44CON London. I had serious reservations about going to the UK (not even in transit!) but Steve Lord and Adrian charm convinced me to give it a try. [Read More]

Rootfool – a small tool to dynamically disable and enable SIP in El Capitan

El Capitan is finally released and System Integrity Protection aka SIP aka rootless is finally a reality we must face. Let me briefly describe SIP (technical details maybe in another post, now that El Capitan is final and out of NDAs). This post by Rich Trouton contains a very good description of its userland implementation and configuration. What is SIP anyway? The description that I like to use is that SIP is a giant system-wide sandbox, that controls access to what Apple considers critical files and folders. [Read More]

Writing Bad @$$ Lamware for OS X

The following is a guest post by noar (@noarfromspace), a long time friend. It shows some simple attacks against BlockBlock, a software developed by Patrick Wardle that monitors OS X common persistence locations for potential malware. The other day noar was telling me about a few bypasses he had found so I invited him to write a guest post. The title is obviously playing with one of Patrick’s presentations. I met Patrick at Shakacon last year and this is not an attempt to shame him (that is reserved mostly for Apple ;-)). [Read More]

BSides Lisbon and SECUINSIDE 2015 presentations

I guess my goal for the remaining 2015 of not doing any presentations will not happen. Two weeks ago I presented at BSides Lisbon 2015 and last week at SECUINSIDE 2015. I’m very happy to see BSides Lisbon returning after the first edition in 2013. Congrats to Bruno, Tiago, and the rest of the team for making it happen. It’s still a small conference but I’m glad they are making it happen, and I will always do my best to help the Portuguese scene going forward. [Read More]

Reversing Prince Harming’s kiss of death

The suspend/resume vulnerability disclosed a few weeks ago (named Prince Harming by Katie Moussouris) turned out to be a zero day. While (I believe) its real world impact is small, it is nonetheless a critical vulnerability and (another) spectacular failure from Apple. It must be noticed that firmware issues are not Apple exclusive. For example, Gigabyte ships their UEFI with the flash always unlocked and other vendors also suffer from all kinds of firmware vulnerabilities. [Read More]

The Empire Strikes Back Apple – how your Mac firmware security is completely broken

If you are a rootkits fan the latest Chaos Communication Congress (CCC) in 2014 brought us two excellent presentations, Thunderstrike by Trammell Hudson and Attacks on UEFI security, inspired by Darth Venami’s misery and Speed Racer by Rafal Wojtczuk and Corey Kallenberg. The first one was related to the possibility to attack EFI from a Thunderbolt device, and the second had a very interesting vulnerability regarding the (U)EFI boot script table. [Read More]

How to fix rootpipe in Mavericks and call Apple’s bullshit bluff about rootpipe fixes

The rootpipe vulnerability was finally fully disclosed last week after a couple of months of expectation since its first announcement. It was disclosed as a hidden backdoor but it’s really something more related to access control and crap design than a backdoor. Although keep in mind that good backdoors should be hard to distinguish from simple errors. In this case there are a lot of services using this feature so it’s hardly a hidden backdoor that just sits there waiting for some evil purpose. [Read More]

How to bypass Google’s Santa LOCKDOWN mode

Santa is a binary whitelisting/blacklisting system made by Google Macintosh Operations Team. While I refer to it as Google’s Santa it is not an official Google product. It is based on a kernel extension and userland components to control the execution of binaries in OS X systems. It features two interesting modes of execution, monitor and lockdown. The monitor mode is a blacklisting system, where all binaries except those blacklisted can run. [Read More]

BadXNU, a rotten apple! – CodeBlue 2014, SyScan 2015 slides and source code

The last SyScan is almost here so it’s time to get again into a plane and travel to Singapore. This means that the slides and source code can finally be released. Below you can find the archive with both presentations slides (they are slightly different, SyScan version fixes/upgrades a few things) and full source code for both rootkit/kext loaders. I hope you enjoy them; they are quite fun techniques, in particular the second one which now I sort of regret to disclose because it’s so cool. [Read More]

https is now (finally) supported!

Hummm this is something that I should have done a long time ago but was always too lazy since there’s not highly critical information here (except some hashes and my PGP key/id). Anyway, you can finally access the blog over https://reverse.put.as. I still need to understand if there’s any impact on Google search stuff by moving it to HTTPS only. Better late then never. Oh and fuck you David Cameron and your stupid populist ideas. [Read More]