Tag Archives: crisis

The Italian morons are back! What are they up to this time?

Nothing đŸ™‚

HackingTeam was deeply hacked in July 2015 and most of their data was spilled into public hands, including source code for all their sofware and also some 0day exploits. This was an epic hack that shown us their crap internal security but more important than that, their was of doing things and internal and external discussions, since using PGP was too much of an annoyance for these guys (Human biases are a royal pain in the ass, I know!). You can consult the email archives on this Wikileaks online and searchable archive. I had some love on those emails although they never sent that promised Playboy subscription (not interested anymore guys, they gave up on nudes!). For an epic presentation about their OS X RCS malware give a look at these slides.

Last Friday a new OS X RCS sample was sent to me (big thanks to @claud_xiao from Palo Alto Networks for the original discovery, and as usual to @noarfromspace for forwarding it to me). My expectations weren’t big since all the public samples were rather old and know we had their source code so if it were an old sample it was totally uninteresting to analyse. But contrary to my expectations there are some interesting details on this sample. So let’s start once more our reverse engineering journey…
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Shakacon #6 presentation: Fuck you Hacking Team, From Portugal with Love.

Aloha,

Shakacon number 6 is over, it was a blast and I must confess it beat my expectations. Congratulations to everyone involved in making it possible. Definitely recommended if you want to speak or attend, and totally worth the massive jet lag ;-).

My presentation was about reverse engineering HackingTeam’s OS X malware latest known sample. The slide count is 206 and I was obviously not able to present everything. The goal is that you have a nice reference available for this malware and also MPRESS unpacking (technically dumping).

This sample in particular was thought to be a newer version of this malware but I try to show you that I don’t think it’s the case and instead, it’s the oldest version of HackingTeam’s OS X malware. If this theory is true, it means we have a two years knowledge gap about the OS X version. Interesting challenge ahead!

The tool I promised to release will have to wait a couple more days since I need to fix its code to implement the fixes I suggest regarding the file and memory sizes differences. Keep watching this space, github or Twitter.

Update: MPRESS dumper source code now available at Github.

Mahalo,
fG!

Links to slides (34.3Mb):

ShakaCon6-FuckYouHackingTeam.pdf
ShakaCon6-FuckYouHackingTeam.pdf (Dropbox mirror)

 

Rex vs The Romans – Anti Hacking Team Kernel Extension

After surviving the five shots at SyScan’s WhiskeyCon I am finally back home and you get a chance to see the slides and code for the TrustedBSD module I presented.

The goal of REX vs The Romans is to work as detection and prevention tool of Hacking Team’s OS X malware. The TrustedBSD hook allows to detect if the system is already infected, and the Kauth listener to warn about any future infection.
The code has a strong assumption, which is that the malware binaries are installed into /Users/username/Library/Preferences. This has been true for all past known samples found in the wild. I do have better work than this but it is embedded in a commercial product so I can’t disclose its code.

The kernel extension will generate a user alert when something wrong is detected, either on installation or already infected system. A message starting with [WARNING] will also be printed to the system log. The following screenshot demonstrates the execution and infection from the dropper in a Lion 10.7.5 system.

ht_detected

You are encouraged to improve this code. Unfortunately I can’t do much more because of the commercial product conflict. If you do so please tell me about it, I might be able to help with some hints and/or fixes.

I am going to try to get a personal kernel extension certificate so I can distribute a ready to use binary version of this extension. That would be the most helpful case for the common users out there. Let’s see if Apple allows me to do so.

The slides are available here. The code is available at Github.
If you have any issues or questions feel free to mail me or post a comment.

SyScan 2014 was awesome, thanks to everyone who attended and made it possible.

Have fun,
fG!

P.S.: The MPRESS dumper will hopefully be released when I do the full presentation on Hacking Team’s OS X malware this year.

Tales from Crisis, Chapter 4: A ghost in the network

This chapter was supposed to be about additional methods to detect OS.X/Crisis but I had the evil idea of taking full control of Crisis, and played with this idea for the last couple of days. It’s pretty damm easy to customize the dropper, and at the limit, be able to deploy your own version of Crisis to anyone. This raises some problematic questions, some of which I was fooling around with at Twitter. To make it clear, I have no intent whatsoever to resell Crisis or something. First because it enters in conflict with my values, and second because it enters a potentially big legal minefield.

To me, hacking is all about raising the weird questions, playing with stuff, and experimenting with what others doesn’t see. I would love to have the resources to answer and test the legal minefield just because it’s a curious topic. The world is increasingly dangerous for hacking. It’s sort of a paradox that in a age of fast access to information the trend seems to be running towards making it more difficult to access and spread information. But enough of philosophical questions!
I will keep researching in private if I have time to. My free time status is going to change soon so things will be different. I still have some very cool ideas to try with Crisis and they would probably generate some interesting articles. We’ll have to wait and see if the environment changes.
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Tales from Crisis, Chapter 3: The Italian Rootkit Job

I always had some strange attraction to rootkits and was thrilled to hear that Crisis had one. This chapter is dedicated to the rootkit implementation, its tricks and how it’s controlled (and its fuckups!).

A small disclosure note about me making fun of Italians on Twitter. I love Italy and have nothing against Italians. We just share some cultural things that I really hate and that’s the reason why I was making fun of Crisis origins and some of its design/features. It’s no coincidence that the South European countries are all in economic trouble đŸ˜‰

The rootkit number of features is very small: it can hide processes, files, and itself. Two versions are available for 32 and 64bits kernels (this post is about the 32bits version using Snow Leopard). Implementation is very simple and has some flaws that I will describe later.
The main feature that got me interested was hiding itself from kextstat because this needs to be done by modifying the sLoadedKexts array (the old kmod list is not enough anymore since it’s deprecated).
It doesn’t seem an easy job to find the location of this symbol and Crisis kind of cheats in doing it. What happens is that the userland backdoor module will solve the kernel symbols and pass them to the kernel module. Done this way it’s very easy to accomplish, although compatibility with future kernel releases might be in jeopardy if sLoadedKexts is modified.
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Tales from Crisis, Chapter 2: Backdoor’s first steps

Let’s continue our cute story about OS.X/Crisis, this time with the startup flow of the main backdoor module.
Please apologize for the delay on this chapter – I had some fun with the rootkit and that diverted me to other things.

The first curious detail about the backdoor module (installed as /Users/USERNAME/Library/Preferences/jlc3V7we.app/IZsROY7X.-MP) is that no obfuscation/anti-debugging tricks are used (except one) so its analysis is easier than the dropper. It also uses Objective-C heavily, which is still a bit annoying in IDA but has the advantage of the code being very descriptive.

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