Tag Archives: vulnerability

Shut up snitch! – reverse engineering and exploiting a critical Little Snitch vulnerability

Little Snitch was among the first software packages I tried to reverse and crack when I started using Macs. In the past I reported some weaknesses related to their licensing scheme but I never audited their kernel code since I am not a fan of I-O Kit reversing. The upcoming DEF CON presentation on Little Snitch re-sparked my curiosity last week and it was finally time to give the firewall a closer look.

Little Snitch version 3.6.2, released in January 2016, fixes a kernel heap overflow vulnerability despite not being mentioned in the release notes – just a “Fixed a rare issue that could cause a kernel panic”. (Hopefully Little Snitch’s developers will revise this policy and be more clear about the vulnerabilities they address, so users can better understand their threat posture.)  Are there any more interesting security issues remaining in version 3.6.3 (current at the time of research) for us to find?

You are reading this because the answer is yes!

What is Little Snitch?

Little Snitch is an application firewall able to detect applications that try to connect to the Internet or other networks, and then prompt the user to decide if they want to allow or block those connection attempts. It is a super-useful addition to OS X because you directly observe and control the network traffic on your Mac, expected and unexpected.
It is widely popular: I personally make sure it’s the first thing I install when configuring new OS X images.
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SyScan360 Singapore 2016 slides and exploit code

The exploit for the bug I presented last March at SyScan360 is today one year old so I decided to release it. I wasn’t sure if I should do it or not since it can be used in the wild but Google Project Zero also released a working version so it doesn’t really make a difference.

I’m also publishing here the final version of the slides that differ slightly from the version made available at the corporate blog.

You can find the slides here and the PoC code at GitHub.

The exploit code is slight different from Ian Beer exploit so you probably might want to give it a look. It’s a pretty clean and neat exploit :-).

You can find Ian Beer’s blog post about this bug here. Bug collisions are not fun, I expected this bug to be alive for a lot longer but Ian Beer is awesome, so hat tip to him.

The bug itself is super fun since it allows you to exploit any SUID binary or entitlements, meaning you can escale privileges to root and then bypass SIP and load unsigned kernel extensions with the same bug. Essentially, massive pwnage with a single bug. The only thing missing is remote code execution. Ohhhhh :-(.

Every OS X version except El Capitan 10.11.4 is vulnerable so if you are running older systems you should consider upgrading asap (they are also vulnerable to other unpatched bugs anyway!).

Have fun,
fG!

Reversing Apple’s syslogd bug

Two days ago El Capitan 10.11.3 was released together with security updates for Yosemite and Mavericks. The bulletin available here describes nine security issues, most of them related to kernel or IOKit drivers. The last security issue is about a memory corruption issue on syslog that could lead to arbitratry code execution with root privileges. I was quite curious about this bug mostly because it involved syslogd, a logging daemon.

This post is about reversing the vulnerability and finding how it could be exploited. Unfortunately for us Apple is very terse on its security updates – for example they say nothing about if it is exploitable on default OS X installations or requires particular conditions. As we will see later on, this bug is not exploitable on default OS X installations.

While Apple makes available the source code for many components used in OS X, most of the time there is a significant delay so we need to use binary diffing to find out the differences between the vulnerable and updated binary. The usual tool for this purpose is BinDiff but there is also a free alternative called Diaphora made by Joxean Koret. Both tools require IDA and on this post we are going to use Diaphora. For this purpose we will need a copy of the vulnerable and patched binaries. The easiest way is to copy the syslogd binary (found at /usr/sbin/syslogd) before the updates are installed (usually it’s a good idea to have virtual machines snapshots for each version) and then after (or just extract the new binary from the update packages – El Capitan, Yosemite, Mavericks). This post will focus on Yosemite binaries.
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Writing Bad @$$ Lamware for OS X

The following is a guest post by noar (@noarfromspace), a long time friend.
It shows some simple attacks against BlockBlock, a software developed by Patrick Wardle that monitors OS X common persistence locations for potential malware. The other day noar was telling me about a few bypasses he had found so I invited him to write a guest post.
The title is obviously playing with one of Patrick’s presentations. I met Patrick at Shakacon last year and this is not an attempt to shame him (that is reserved mostly for Apple ;-)). It just illustrates the problems of building defensive tools and how much trust you put on them. By personal experience I can tell you that building a security product is a much harder task than what you might think initially.

Disclaimer: we both work for an endpoint software company. Together with another colleague I wrote an OS X version from scratch. I know very well the insane amount of problems that need to be solved, and they never end. When you build something you are always at mercy of potential security problems, we are no exception. Humans make mistakes. Offense is way easier ;-).

Anyway, enjoy it and hopefully learn something new!
Thank you noar!
fG!

I remember those days when there were only 3 or 4 security software editors for OS X. As the threat counts increased, the market grew up too. Many products are now selling you a feeling of being secure: most of them are post-mortem detection tools, and none is re-inventing the security paradigm.

This dinosaur fight left some room for an altruistic new hype: free – but not open source – security tools. Should we trust them blindly?

I am dedicating this post to HGDB, a former colleague and friend. Your sudden departure is leaving us in an infinite sadness. May you rest in peace.

BlockBlock

New utilities are emerging to free the user from major companies subscription fees, like the recently acquired Adware Medic or Objective-See tools KnockKnock and BlockBlock. So I had interest in reversing Patrick Wardle’s BlockBlock, a self-proclaimed continual runtime protection.
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Reversing Prince Harming’s kiss of death

The suspend/resume vulnerability disclosed a few weeks ago (named Prince Harming by Katie Moussouris) turned out to be a zero day. While (I believe) its real world impact is small, it is nonetheless a critical vulnerability and (another) spectacular failure from Apple. It must be noticed that firmware issues are not Apple exclusive. For example, Gigabyte ships their UEFI with the flash always unlocked and other vendors also suffer from all kinds of firmware vulnerabilities.

As I wrote in the original post, I found the vulnerability a couple of months ago while researching different ways to reset a Mac firmware password. At the time, I did not research the source of the bug due to other higher priority tasks. One of the reasons for its full disclosure was the assumption that Apple knew about this problem since newer machines were not vulnerable. So the main question after the media storm was if my assumption was wrong or not and what was really happening inside Apple’s EFI.

The bug is definitely not related to a hardware failure and can be fixed with a (simple) firmware update. The initial assumptions pointing to some kind of S3 boot script failure were correct.
Apparently, Apple did not follow Intel’s recommendation and failed to lock the flash protections (and also SMRR registers) after the S3 suspend cycle. The necessary information is not saved, so the locks will not be restored when the machine wakes up from sleep.

This also allows finding which Mac models are vulnerable to this bug.
All machines based on Ivy Bridge, Sandy Bridge (and maybe older) platforms are vulnerable. This includes the newest Mac Pro since its Xeon E5 CPU is still based on Ivy Bridge platform. All machines based on Haswell or newer platforms are not vulnerable.

Now let’s jump to the technical part and understand why the bug occurs. I am also going to show you how to build a temporary fix.
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How to fix rootpipe in Mavericks and call Apple’s bullshit bluff about rootpipe fixes

The rootpipe vulnerability was finally fully disclosed last week after a couple of months of expectation since the first announcement. It was disclosed as a hidden backdoor but it’s really more something related to access control and crap design than a backdoor. Although keep in mind that good backdoors should be hard to distinguish from simple errors. In this case there are a lot of services using this feature so it’s hardly a hidden backdoor that just sits there waiting for some evil purpose. Apple doesn’t have a stellar security record so the simple explanation has a good chance to prevail over the backdoor story.

Anyway that’s not what really matter for this post. The most important issue is that a fix was made available only for Yosemite 10.10.3. Every other OS X version is left vulnerable. While this is a local privilege escalation vulnerability there are many scenarios where it can be used (you don’t audit every single installer and software that runs on your Mac, do you?). It is extremely reliable and can be used in different ways other than just creating a suid binary.
The vulnerability author wrote the following regarding this issue:
“Apple indicated that this issue required a substantial amount of changes on their side, and that they will not back port the fix to 10.9.x and older.”

So essentially Apple refuses to patch this in all versions except the latest one because it’s apparently too much work. There is no official statement from Apple regarding the EOL (End of Life) status about all previous OS X versions so this course of action is quite strange. Even stranger when Apple backports some security patches to those older versions so they are implicitly not yet dead versions.

In this situation what can we do?
We can try to verify what is the real impact of Apple’s fix and call their bluff if we can prove that we are able to produce a fix without significant changes to the operating system. Challenge accepted!
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